Integrated Environmental Services, Inc. (IES)

Integrated Environmental Services, Inc. (IES)

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Our experience and leadership, excellent client relationships and outstanding reputation are our strengths. All of this and more has placed us as one of the most respected environmental firms in the world.

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Technologies for the on-site remediation of high hazard waste.

Technologies for the on-site remediation of high hazard waste.

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IES is an inventor and innovator of the most advanced equipment used in the environmental remediation community. We hold 30 patents related to remediation, reclamation, and processing of high hazard materials.

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Compressed Gas Cylinders

Compressed Gas Cylinders

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Handling waste compressed gas cylinders poses unique hazards and challenges associated with the chemical composition of each gas, the energy of compression, and the capability of a gas to move and flow freely when not contained.

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Process Safety Management

Process Safety Management

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"In response to the Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (HHC) standard IES has developed programs designed to prevent or minimize the consequences of catastrophic releases of HHCs.

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SDS System

sds-imageThe Safe Delivery System (SDS) technology was developed to minimize hazards associated with handling very toxic gases such as arsine, particularly in the semiconductor fabrication industry.   The technology employs a “porous” media inside a gas cylinder into which a high-purity gas is injected.  The absorption media effectively holds the injected gas, releasing it only when heated and subjected to vacuum.  This characteristic enables the cylinders to exhibit little or no pressure when they are in storage, which greatly reduces the risk of highly toxic gas leaking from a cylinder and creating a hazardous environment.

Several gases used for manufacturing semiconductors, particularly hydride gases, were well-suited to SDS packaging.  Manufacturers also embraced the technology, particularly where limited quantities of gas were required.  Use of SDS enabled end-users to scale-back on costly gas scrubber and control systems due to the inherent safety of handling non-pressurized cylinders containing highly toxic gases.

As technology improved the original SDS 1 cylinders became either obsolete or reached the end of there service life.  IES developed the SDS Cylinder Processing system to handle these waste cylinders.

 The processing system devised for converting arsine gas inside the SDS 1 cylinders into inorganic arsenic utilizes thermal oxidation to convert arsine into arsenic oxide.  Removing arsine from the SDS 1 cylinders is accomplished by controlled heating combined with vacuum evacuation.  Arsenic oxides created during the thermal oxidation stage are removed from the system via an integral water scrubber that directs entrained arsenic oxide particulates into a water stream.  This wastewater is directed into a small conditioning system where pH is adjusted and ferric chloride is added to precipitate out an arsenic-laden sludge.  The sludge is subsequently solidified and the resultant mass is disposed of at a landfill permitted to accept this type of waste.

To increase processing efficiency, two separate loading racks are used enabling operators to prepare one load of cylinders while the other is being processed.  As one load is removed from the ovens and allowed to cool, the second load is set into place to begin the heating cycle.  In this fashion, downtime between process batches is reduced and operating efficiency maximized.

Control of the heating cycle is exerted by a central computer which monitors heating characteristics on each cylinder and regulates electricity flow to each oven.  Thermocouples associated with each cylinder continuously monitor the cylinder temperature and provide input to the control computer.  Thermostatic control is exerted on an individual basis from the control computer.  A graphic interface on the control computer enables operators to visually monitor the status of each cylinder at all times.

The entire processing system is located inside two intermodal containers positioned side-by-side and connected via various tubing and electrical conduits.  One container holds the heating and vacuum pump equipment used to force the arsine out of the zeolite media upon which it is absorbed.  The second container holds both the thermal oxidation system and water conditioning system.  Sensor and control interfaces are located in both containers but are connected to the main control computer through a central panel located in the second container.